Thursday, 22 July 2010

Pine forest


Pine plantations also dominate the landscape on this trip. I know some of you commented that you are not keen on them when I posted a pine forest on the last trip. I personally find them quite majestic and see them as a farming crop, albeit a very long term one.

9 comments:

  1. i adore pine forests! the scent, the dark
    green, and, as you said, "the majesty."

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  2. Pines are so beautiful:)
    Have a great day!

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  3. I like the way you composed this!

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  4. Another journey - great, these pines look spooky.

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  5. They do gone on for klms though, and sour all the earth beneath them. But okay, I will try to think of them as a crop.

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  6. I just read an article in our local paper that claimed that mixed forest with 80% deciduous trees was is the most aesthetically pleasing mix

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  7. AB, that is interesting. As most native trees in Australia are not deciduous I think they would annoy people as much as the pines, being clearly not native. What type of deciduous trees do they plant?

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  8. Joan Elizabeth: Some figures for the Saarland. 38% (ca. 90,000 hecatares) of the Saarland is forest. About half of that belongs to Saarforst. In their woods, 73% of trees are deciduous, the most common sorts being beech (30%) and oak (22%). Amongst the pine trees, spruce is the most popular.

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  9. AB, thanks for the info. This pine is radiata a non-native species. We do have native pines such as Hoop Pine which are grown in plantations as well as various species of eucalypt. Poplar was the only deciduous species on the list I looked at and originally grown for matchsticks so not much around any more.

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