Wednesday, 26 January 2011

Hollywood


You will notice that unlike houses of this era in Sydney which have red bricks and tiled or slate roofs, old homes in the mountains are more often built of timber with corrugated iron roofs. These homes are much loved and in the last ten years or so we and most of our neighbours have painted our homes, added modern extensions and tidied our overgrown gardens.

14 comments:

  1. Great name on a lovely old house. But is it Hollywood in California or Hollywood, N Ireland?
    Happy Australia Day Joan! Paul at Leeds daily photo

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  2. What a beautiful place! The door as well of many other details are really pretty!:)

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  3. The palette for the photograph is just perfect. To my eyes, at any rate.

    The difference is quite marked, isn't it? Ours have had gardens (front and back) truncated over the years by subdivisions and road widening. I wonder if the weatherboard/brick divide is due to the availability of timber and clay?

    However, it would cost more to heat a timber house, AND they would burn more readily in bush-fires.

    As well as the variey of names, I am looking out for the variety of design as well. Found quite a variety down here.

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  4. Yes I think they have chosen their colour scheme well. Not many years ago this place was quite run down.

    I am sure the choice of building materials relates to what is most available locally as transport would have been a major issue. BTW, timber homes don't cost more to heat when they are insulated, I guess they do burn more readily but plenty of brick houses burn in bush fires too. Our timber home here is perfectly cosy as was the timber home we had in Canberra.

    I too was hunting out design differences and other quirks to show as we go along.

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  5. Love seeing these hose names. My place is called Nindethana.

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  6. Thanks for the encouraging comments on my blog. A beaut picture today as well.

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  7. I enjoy this kind of low balconies very much. It's a lovely entranceway.

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  8. Oh wow!
    That's nearly the same colour we are going to paint our house.
    Ours will be a bit greyer - not so greeny.
    But doesn't that look beautiful with the mountain trees?

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  9. Love the weatherboard and corrugated iron homes of that era. What an unusual name for an Australian home, though.

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  10. Pam, I agree a strange name but I think Paul's comment above is the clue ... it is someone harking back to a town in Ireland rather than the Californian Hollywood. You will find later in the week that lots of the houses are named after places in the 'old country'.

    Jim, do you have any idea of the history behind your house name?

    Letty, how exciting changing your house colour.

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  11. Joan, I believe Nindethana is an Aboriginal word meaning 'Ours'. Apparently it's quite a commonly used house name around Australia. I've found this website that might be useful for determining the meaning of Aboriginal house names.
    House Name Heritage

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  12. Joan, I believe Nindethana is an Aboriginal word meaning 'Ours'. Apparently it's quite a commonly used house name around Australia. I've found this website that might be useful for determining the meaning of Aboriginal house names.
    House Name Heritage

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