Sunday, 1 February 2009

New paths


The holiday is well and truly over and I am still short of time so will not be continuing here at least for a while. I am however posting daily about my summer sojourns beyond the mountains at Sweet Wayfaring.

This path is the street front of my garden. The fence is deliberatly low so passers strolling under the pines can look in and enjoy. You can too as I am starting a daily garden meditation. You may like to visit occasionally and reflect.

Words to walk with:
The Journey by Mary Oliver
One day you finally knew
what you had to do, and began,
though the voices around you
kept shouting
their bad advice–
though the whole house
began to tremble
and you felt the old tug
at your ankles.

Mend my life!”
each voice cried.
But you didn’t stop.
You knew what you had to do,
though the wind pried
with its stiff fingers
at the very foundations,
though their melancholy
was terrible.

It was already late
enough, and a wild night,
and the road full of fallen
branches and stones.
But little by little,
as you left their voices behind,
the stars began to burn
through the sheets of clouds,
and there was a new voice
which you slowly
recognized as your own,
that kept you company
as you strode deeper and deeper
into the world,
determined to do
the only thing you could do–
determined to save
the only life you could save.

Click here to view thumbnails for all participants in the theme day Paths and Passages.

10 comments:

  1. Shady lane just begging to be investigated with the camera.

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  2. a poem and gorgeous strong large trees providing a shady walk. very nice for theme day!

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  3. Of course! When you are short of time, start another blog!

    I must write that down!

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  4. I see thou hast a Jiminy Cricket of thine own.

    A ripper of a poem ...

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  5. I've only recently discovered Mary Oliver.

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  6. Midge, starting a new blog is not quite as silly as it sounds. Firstly, there's no travel involved to find photogenic subjects. Second, if I visit the garden more often (which I will have to do to keep posting) then I might notice the weeds and thirsty plants and actually tend my garden. Here's hoping anyway.
    I did think hard and long as to how I could keep up daily blogging in a sustainable way.

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  7. Yes, the choice was just so good: always available subject matter with a spin off for the garden itself.

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  8. I am just now discovering Mary Oliver. Afriend recently sent me this one, In Blackwater Woods, to help me get ready to have one of my kitties put down:

    Look, the trees
    are turning
    their own bodies
    into pillars

    of light,
    are giving off the rich
    fragrance of cinnamon
    and fulfillment,

    the long tapers
    of cattails
    are bursting and floating away over
    the blue shoulders

    of the ponds,
    and every pond,
    no matter what its
    name is, is

    nameless now.
    Every year
    everything
    I have ever learned

    in my lifetime
    leads back to this: the fires
    and the black river of loss
    whose other side
    is salvation,
    whose meaning
    none of us will ever know.
    To live in this world

    you must be able
    to do three things:
    to love what is mortal:
    to hold it

    against your bones knowing
    your own life depends on it;
    and, when the time comes to let it go,
    to let it go.

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  9. Thank you for this contribution PJ. I recently purchased a book of Mary's poems and will certainly be seeking out more. She has a very deft touch with capturing life and nature.

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